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European Geosciences Union

Division on Natural Hazards
nh.egu.eu

Division on Natural Hazards

President: Giorgio Boni (nh@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Ira Didenkulova (didenkulova@mail.ru)

The Natural Hazards (NH) Division of the EGU covers all the geological and geophysical processes that can be hazardous and can produce damage to the environment and to the society. Therefore it is a place where scientists and researchers of various geo-disciplines meet with sociologists, economists and people responsible for territorial and urban defense and planning policies. The aim is to improve the understanding of the evolution of the processes and to discuss new technologies, methods and strategies to mitigate their disastrous effects. The Division is structured in nine Subdivisions covering specific hazards. Of these seven are listed here: hydro-meteorological, volcanic, landslide, earthquake-, sea and ocean, remote sensing and hazards, wildfire hazards. The eighth Subdivision covers biological and environmental hazards and in addition hazards not included in the previous ones. The ninth (natural hazards and society) focuses on the social aspects of the hazards, including development sustainability, emergency, warning, after-disaster resilience, etc. Most of the topics that are treated in the NH Division are also treated in other EGU Divisions, which is expected due to the intrinsic transversal nature of the NH Division. For example, earthquakes are the main interest of the Seismology Division, but they are also of interest here where the chief topics are, among others, how to evaluate vulnerability and risk, how to reduce the  impact on human lives and society, how geo-scientists can contribute to a prompt recovery of a community affected by disasters.

The NH Division is one the historical Divisions of the EGU that was established since when EGU was founded and has been and is one of the largest divisions to which many geo-scientists provide steadily contributions of papers and ideas over the years.

As for all EGU Divisions, an Early Career Scientist Award is established also for the NH Division and is given to young researchers who obtain outstanding results in the assessment and mitigation of natural hazard adopting a multidisciplinary approach. In addition, the NH Division awards the Plinius Medal devoted since 2012 to mid-career researchers and the Soloviev Medal for scientists who give outstanding contributions in fundamental aspects of research on natural hazards.

Recent awardees

Giuseppe De Natale

Giuseppe De Natale

  • 2018
  • Sergey Soloviev Medal

The 2018 Sergey Soloviev Medal is awarded to Giuseppe De Natale for his fundamental contributions to the assessment and management of seismic and volcanic hazards and risk.


Hannah L. Cloke

Hannah L. Cloke

  • 2018
  • Plinius Medal

The 2018 Plinius Medal is awarded to Hannah L. Cloke for her outstanding research on uncertainties in modelling flood hazards and understanding risks in operational ensemble flood forecasting as well as climate impact assessments of future flood risks.


Thomas Wahl

Thomas Wahl

  • 2018
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award

The 2018 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award is awarded to Thomas Wahl for his fundamental contributions to the research on assessment of coastal-flood risk.


Augusto Neri

Augusto Neri

  • 2017
  • Sergey Soloviev Medal

The 2017 Sergey Soloviev Medal is awarded to Augusto Neri for his pioneering research in fluid dynamics that revolutionised our understanding of eruption processes, and for his generous insights and efforts worldwide to mitigate pyroclastic flow and ashfall/gas hazards.


Bruno Merz

Bruno Merz

  • 2017
  • Plinius Medal

The 2017 Plinius Medal is awarded to Bruno Merz for groundbreaking contributions in the field of flood risk research and practice through introducing and implementing an integrated framework of combined vulnerability and hazard assessment.


James E. Daniell

James E. Daniell

  • 2017
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award

The 2017 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award is awarded to James E. Daniell for his interdisciplinary contribution to multi-risk research, focusing on the consequences of natural hazards, with strong links with socio-economic research.


Anastasiia Domina

Anastasiia Domina

  • 2017
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2017 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Anastasiia Domina The effect of stratification and topography on high-frequency internal waves in a continental shelf sea


Florian Albrecht

Florian Albrecht

  • 2017
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2017 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Florian Albrecht Validating the usability of an interactive Earth Observation based web service for landslide investigation


Jamie W. McCaughey

Jamie W. McCaughey

  • 2017
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2017 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Jamie W. McCaughey Societal acceptance of unnecessary evacuation

Latest posts from the NH blog

Steaming badly: what do we know about hazardous and less known hydrothermal eruptions in volcanic environments?

Steaming badly: what do we know about hazardous and less known hydrothermal eruptions in volcanic environments?

Volcanic eruptions are among the fascinating natural phenomena we can observe on Earth. Along with being very attractive, they are hazardous for both society and infrastructures. Eruptive styles are various and today we focus our attention on one particular type of explosive event: hydrothermal eruptions. We have interviewed Cristian Montanaro on the topic. Dr. Cristian Montanaro is an experimental and field volcanologist currently working at the University of Auckland. He obtained his PhD at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich in 2016 focusing on …


Multi-Natural-Hazards: how can we deal with such complex chain of events?

Multi-Natural-Hazards: how can we deal with such complex chain of events?

Today we have the honor to have Prof. Victor Jetten as our guest. Throughout his career Victor, has been working in modelling of natural hazard and land degradation processes. Starting with biomass and grazing capacity, the effects of logging on the natural rain forest water balance, he then moved to soil erosion and land degradation processes as a result of land use change and overgrazing. He believes that all these processes should not be studied and modeled as separate disciplines …


What is coming at the next EGU’s General Assembly?

The next EGU’s General Assembly is taking place in three weeks! We bet you already started planning your program for the week, and that Natural Hazard (NH) sessions are included, and, especially if you are an Early Career Scientist, you have found many sessions and courses targeting your specific needs and interests. What fits more to your interests: Attend talks and posters, learn and improve skills, or take an active role in a serious game? Or maybe all of them? …


International Research Projects: what can we learn from CHANGES?

Today I have the pleasure to post an interview on International Research Projects. The interviewee, Dr. Cees van Westen, does not need any introduction for those who work in the field on Natural Hazards. Today, he will “speak” as the coordinator of the CHANGES project and further information can be asked directly to him if this interview will stimulate your curiosity (e-mail: c.j.vanwesten@utwente.nl, tel: +31534874263). Dr. Cees van Westen obtained MSc in Physical Geography from the University of Amsterdam in …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

With the EGU General Assembly just over a week away, we have a number of updates on the meeting, happening in Vienna from 8–13 April. Our conference organiser Copernicus has launched a great mobile app, and we recently announced a number of measures to reduce the environmental impact of the conference, from encouraging people to travel by train to introducing an option for participants to offset their carbon footprint. On the EGU blog, GeoLog, you can find posts about the city of Vienna, and a selection of Union-wide events, short courses and policy activities at the EGU General Assembly. For students taking part in the Outstanding Student Poster and PICO, there are also some tips from the judges on how to prepare a poster or PICO presentation.

This month, we have also announced that we are accepting nominations for EGU awards and medals. We encourage the EGU membership to consider gender, geographical and cultural balance when nominating outstanding Earth, planetary and space scientists at various career stages.

Last but not the least, we have also announced that we are launching two new publications at the 2018 General Assembly: a journal, Geoscience Communication, and a compilation, the Encyclopedia of Geosciences. Find these and many other EGU updates below.

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