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Submit your images to the EGU Imaggeo Photo Competition

  • EGU news
  • 15 January 2018

The eight annual EGU photo competition opens on 15 January. Up until 15 February (note earlier deadline this year!), every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image on any broad theme related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences. Simply upload your photos to imaggeo and choose the option to include them in the photo contest.


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Become an EGU member or renew your membership!

  • EGU news
  • 19 December 2017

The EGU is Europe’s premier geosciences union, dedicated to the pursuit of excellence in the Earth, planetary, and space sciences for the benefit of humanity, worldwide. Membership is open to individuals who subscribe to the objectives of the EGU and who are professionally engaged in or associated with either the geosciences, planetary and space sciences, or related studies. Membership is affordable and provides a number of benefits.


A preview of the responsive design on the new EGU website

New EGU website launched

  • EGU news
  • 18 December 2017

The online home of the European Geosciences Union, egu.eu, has a new and improved look. The new website has a more modern, image-based layout and a fully responsive page design.



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Applications open for the EGU General Assembly Mentoring Programme

  • EGU news
  • 6 November 2017

For the second year in a row, the EGU is offering a mentoring programme for novice conference attendees, students, and early career scientists at its annual General Assembly. The programme aims to facilitate new connections that may lead to long-term professional relationships within the Earth, planetary and space science communities. We especially encourage potential mentors to sign up and share their expertise with first-timers at the General Assembly.


Highlight articles

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

Response to marine cloud brightening in a multi-model ensemble

Marine cloud brightening (MCB) has been proposed to help limit global warming. We present here the first multi-model assessment of idealized MCB simulations from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project. While all models predict a global cooling as intended, there is considerable spread between the models both in terms of radiative forcing and the climate response, largely linked to the substantial differences in the models’ representation of clouds.


Biogeosciences

Reviews and syntheses: to the bottom of carbon processing at the seafloor

Organic carbon processing at the seafloor is studied by geologists to better understand the sedimentary record, by biogeochemists to quantify burial and respiration, by organic geochemists to elucidate compositional changes, and by ecologists to follow carbon transfers within food webs. These disciplinary approaches have their strengths and weaknesses. This award talk provides a synthesis, highlights the role of animals in sediment carbon processing and presents some new concepts.


Hydrology and Earth System Sciences

Can riparian vegetation shade mitigate the expected rise in stream temperatures due to climate change during heat waves in a human-impacted pre-alpine river?

In eastern Austria, where air temperature rise is double that recorded globally, stream temperatures of a human-impacted river were simulated during heat waves, as calculated by regional climate models until 2100. An increase of up to 3 °C was predicted – thus exceeding thresholds of resident cold-adapted species. Vegetation management scenarios showed that adding vegetation can reduce both absolute temperatures and its rate of increase but is not able to fully mitigate the expected rise.


The Cryosphere

On the similarity and apparent cycles of isotopic variations in East Antarctic snow pits

We explain why snow pits across different sites in East Antarctica show visually similar isotopic variations. We argue that the similarity and the apparent cycles of around 20  cm in the δD and δ18O variations are the result of a seasonal cycle in isotopes, noise, for example from precipitation intermittency, and diffusion. The near constancy of the diffusion length across many ice-coring sites explains why the structure and cycle length is largely independent of the accumulation conditions.


Latest posts from EGU blogs

Imaggeo on Mondays: Decreasing Moon

Imaggeo on Mondays: Decreasing Moon

This picture shows the decreasing Moon on May 6, 2015, two days after the full Moon, as viewed from Hamburg, Germany. There are still 96.4% of the lunar front illuminated. The Moon does not glow on its own, but its surface reflects the sunlight. The Sun always illuminates a complete half of our natural satellite, which, in its orbit around our planet, always turns its face (which we see at full Moon) toward the Earth. As the Moon is in …


SeismoChat: How to disarm earthquakes

SeismoChat: How to disarm earthquakes

Solmaz Mohajder is a researcher at the Earth System Dynamics Research group of University of Tübingen in Germany. She has published an online database and an interactive map for active faults in Central Asia (Mohajder et al., 2016). More recently, Solmaz and her colleagues have compiled fault slip rates to investigate whether deformation rates from GPS and from geologic observations provide consistent slip rate information at the orogen scale (Mohadjer et al., 2017). In 2016, Solmaz was awarded an EGU …


Image of the Week - Ice caps on Mars?!

Image of the Week - Ice caps on Mars?!

Much like our Planet Earth, Mars has polar ice caps too, one for each pole: the Martian North Polar Ice Cap (shown on our image of the week) and the Southern Polar Ice Cap. Yet, their composition and structure reveals these ice caps are quite different from those of Planet Earth… Mars refresher As a refresher, here are some Mars facts: Mars is the 4th planet from the sun. Its equatorial diameter is half the size of the Earth’s, but …