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Apply to be an EGU division early career scientist representative

  • EGU news
  • 1 February 2018

Early career scientists (ECS) make up a significant proportion of the EGU membership and it’s important to us that your voices get heard. To make sure that happens, each division appoints an ECS representative: the vital link between the Union and the ECS membership. This year a number of divisions are looking for new representatives. Follow the link to find out more, including how to get involved.

Julia Rosen and Vivien Cumming, winners of the EGU 2018 Science Journalism Fellowship

Julia Rosen and Vivien Cumming awarded EGU Science Journalism Fellowship

  • Press release
  • 16 January 2018

The European Geosciences Union (EGU) has named journalists Julia Rosen and Vivien Cumming as the winners of its 2018 Science Journalism Fellowship. The support will allow Rosen to travel to the UK to write about the role of soil in the phosphorus crisis, while Cumming will follow scientists in Myanmar to tell the story of carbon in rivers.

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Become an EGU member or renew your membership!

  • EGU news
  • 19 December 2017

The EGU is Europe’s premier geosciences union, dedicated to the pursuit of excellence in the Earth, planetary, and space sciences for the benefit of humanity, worldwide. Membership is open to individuals who subscribe to the objectives of the EGU and who are professionally engaged in or associated with either the geosciences, planetary and space sciences, or related studies. Membership is affordable and provides a number of benefits.

Highlight articles


A systemic approach for modeling soil functions

This paper deals with the importance of soil for our terrestrial environment and the need to predict the impact of soil management on the multitude of functions that soil provides. We suggest to consider soil as a self-organized complex system and provide a concept of how this could be achieved. This includes how soil research, currently fragmented into a number of more or less disjunct disciplines, may be integrated to substantially contribute to a science-based evaluation of soil functions.


Ideas and perspectives: hydrothermally driven redistribution and sequestration of early Archaean biomass – the “hydrothermal pump hypothesis”

The origin of organic matter in the oldest rocks on Earth is commonly ambiguous (biotic vs. abiotic). This problem culminates in the case of hydrothermal chert veins that contain abundant organic matter. Here we demonstrate a microbial origin of kerogen embedded in a 3.5 Gyr old hydrothermal chert vein. We explain this finding with the large-scale redistribution of biomass by hydrothermal fluids, emphasizing the interplay between biological and abiological processes on the early Earth.

Earth System Dynamics

Thermodynamics of saline and fresh water mixing in estuaries

This paper presents a new equation for the dispersion of salinity in alluvial estuaries based on the maximum power concept. The new equation is physically based and replaces previous empirical equations. It is very useful for application in practice because in contrast to previous methods it no longer requires a calibration parameter, turning the method into a predictive method. The paper presents successful applications in more than 23 estuaries in different parts of the world.

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

Evaluation of stratospheric age of air from CF4, C2F6, C3F8, CHF3, HFC-125, HFC-227ea and SF6; implications for the calculations of halocarbon lifetimes, fractional release factors and ozone depletion potentials

Chemical species measured in stratospheric air can be used as proxies for stratospheric circulation changes which cannot be measured directly. A range of tracers is important to understand changing stratospheric dynamics. We demonstrate the suitability of PFCs and HFCs as tracers and support recent work that reduces the current stratospheric lifetime of SF6. Updates to policy-relevant parameters (e.g. stratospheric lifetime) linked to this change are provided for O3-depleting substances.

Latest posts from EGU blogs

Happy birthday plate tectonics!

Happy birthday plate tectonics!

Post by Elco Luijendijk, a junior lecturer, and David Hindle, lecturer and head of geodynamic modelling, both at the Department of Structural Geology and Geodynamics at the University of Göttingen, in Germany. _______________________________________________ As we’ve firmly moved into 2018, we can say happy 50th birthday to one of the most revolutionary scientific theories of the last century: plate tectonics. Here we discuss the birth of plate tectonics and what it means for hydrogeology. Plate tectonic theory explains the how the …

Image of the Week - Broccoli on Kilimanjaro!

Image of the Week - Broccoli on Kilimanjaro!

On the plateau of Kilimanjaro, Tanzania, the remnants of a glacier can be found and the ice from that glacier contains a rather interesting feature – Broccoli! Not the vegetable, but bubbles that look a lot like it. Our Image of the Week shows some of these strange “Broccoli Bubbles”. Read on to find out more about where these were found and how we can see them. There is not much ice left on the mountain plateau of Kilimanjaro (Fig. …

GeoTalk: How will large Icelandic eruptions affect us and our environment?

GeoTalk: How will large Icelandic eruptions affect us and our environment?

Geotalk is a regular feature highlighting early career researchers and their work. In this interview we speak to Anja Schmidt, an interdisciplinary researcher at the University of Cambridge who draws from atmospheric science, climate modelling, and volcanology to better understand the environmental impact of volcanic eruptions. She is also the winner of at 2018 Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists. Thank you for talking to us today! Could you introduce yourself and tell us a little more about …